Coping with period pain. A BBW guide.

by admin on October 31, 2011

The larger date can also be affected by period pains.Period pains affect most women but as many as 10% of women experience severe enough pain that it impacts on their ability to perform day to day functions. In some women, the pain has been likened to pain experienced during labour. Do remember that this advice is no substitute for the expert care offered to you by your GP. Please seek professional advice before taking any medication.
Causes:
There are 2 types of period pain. When there is no disease of the uterus, it is referred to as Primary or Spasmodic dysmenorrhoea. Classic symptoms include cramps in the lower abdomen area radiating out towards the back and thighs, headache, vomiting and diarrhoea. It is the most common type and affects teenagers and women in their early twenties. It usually starts on the first day of your period and is caused by the uterus contracting to shed its lining to make way for a new one that will help in a fertilized egg becoming implanted in the womb at the beginning of your period. Chemicals called prostaglandins build up in the lining of the uterus. These prostaglandins help the uterus contract in order to dislodge the lining. In some cases, too much Prostaglandis have built up in the lining causingthe muscles of the uterus squeeze and contract harder than normal to dislodge the thickened lining. The contractions can also restrict blood flow to the uterus making the pain worse.
Coping with Primary Dysmenorrhoea:

  • Over the counter medicines like Ibuprofen have proven effective in helping to cope with pains associated with Primary Dysmenorrhoea. It works by stopping or reducing the amount of Prostaglandis produced by the body.
  • Painkillers ie Paracetamol can also produce quick relief  from period pains
  • Oral contraceptives (the Pill) can also help by causing the lining of the uterus to thin reducing the amount of prostaglandis produced. As with all medication, consult your GP beforehand.
  • Resting in bed and heat treatment ie with a hot water bottle or in a hot bath with aromatherapy oils can also in some cases relieve pain. So you larger dates now have an extra reason not to go to work!

Secondary Dysmenorrhoea.
This is also known as congestive Dysmenorrhoea is when a disease or some structural abnormality either within the uterus or outside causes painful periods. Diseases such as Fibroids – (benign tumours made of muscle and tissue, which grow inside the uterus) influenced by the sex hormone oestrogen or an infection of the uterus (pelvic infection) can be underlying causes. In this type of period pain, the symptoms can start a week or more before the actual period itself. Symptoms include heavy bleeding, pain during sex, and irregular cycles. Secondary Dysmenorrhoea may not start until the mid twenties but is particularly prevalent among women between the ages of 30 and 45 and is not restricted to a particular time of the month. If for any reason you begin to experience period pain as an adult, then visit your GP.

Coping with Secondary Dysmenorrhoea:

As this is caused by some general underlying cause, the best treatment is to consult your GP who will diagnose the problem and decide the best course of treatment.

In general, there are a couple of lifestyle changes that could help ease the discomfort of period pains. These include

  • Quitting smoking: By reducing Oxygen to the pelvic area, period pain is believed to increase.
  • Exercising
  • Use supplements, containing gamma linolenic acid (GLA) such as evening primrose oil or starflower oil or vitamin B6. These help by maintaining hormonal balance and reducing breast pain.
  • A week before your period, cut down on salt, alcohol and caffeine to reduce water retention.
  • Drink plenty of water. If your consumption is less than you need, your body hoards the little it has leading to water retention.
  • Have sex. An orgasm relaxes your muscles and your body produces helpful hormones. Plus it takes your mind off the pain you might be feeling.
This article was first published on CurvyDate.co.uk, a UK dating BBW site and a place to mingle with plus size singles.

 

 

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